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The 4013 urban premises to receive NBN satellite

30 Mar 2017
NbnNews

Exclusive: City areas shunted onto Sky Muster.

More than 4000 premises in “urban” electorates across Australia are being offered Sky Muster satellite services to connect to the national broadband network.

The numbers come from a fresh dump of NBN rollout data by federal electorate that was released this week under freedom of information.

While most of the data is old – pre-dating the rollout information available in iTnews’ reconstructed three-year NBN plan - the new dataset contains one striking feature: a rare, granular breakdown of NBN Co’s satellite numbers.

NBN Co has come under fire in recent months for refusing to disclose how many ADSL users will be transitioned to satellite-only broadband under the NBN.

iTnews earlier this month published an investigation revealing 62 towns promised fibre-to-the-node (FTTN) that had been switched to the fixed wireless footprint instead.

To continue reading the article: click here. (itnews.com.au)

NBN announces 100Mbps fixed-wireless product

30 Mar 2017
NbnNews

NBN fixed-wireless users will be able to connect at speeds of 100/40Mbps next year thanks to a new product utilising carrier aggregation and a new wireless NTD developed alongside Ericsson, NetComm Wireless, and Qualcomm.

The National Broadband Network (NBN) company has launched a new fixed-wireless product enabling wholesale speeds of 100Mbps download and 40Mbps upload.

Fixed-wireless users will be able to attain higher speeds through the use of carrier aggregation, which increases bandwidth and capacity.

According to NBN, it will launch the new product around this time next year, with users who take up the product to be issued a new wireless network termination device (NTD) developed by NBN in partnership with Ericsson, Qualcomm, and NetComm Wireless.

NBN said the product demonstrates its intent to launch upgrade paths across all of its network technologies, enabling faster speeds in future.

"This is just one more example of NBN's flexibility to introduce technology advancements without slowing down the rollout," NBN CEO Bill Morrow said.

To continue reading the article: click here. (zdnet.com)

Rolling shutdown of Optus 2G network imminent

30 Mar 2017
OptusNews

Optus is set to progressively close down its 2G mobile network with the shutdown of the old network to be staggered over five months.

The closure starts next week with services in the Northern Territory and Western Australia to be shut off from 3 April.

And Optus 2G customers in South Australia, Queensland, Victoria, New South Wales, Tasmania and the ACT will see their 2G services end in August.

The Optus 2G closure follows Telstra’s shutdown of its 2G network late last year. Vodafone plans to shut 2G services nationally in September

Optus’ 2G is scheduled to be fully shut down by the end of August and the telco says it will review options to re-allocate some of the spectrum to improve customer experience and mobile services.

To continue reading the article: click here. (itwire.com)

NBN finally steps in to save stranded estate

29 Mar 2017
NbnNews

NBN Co has stepped up with an emergency solution for a new housing estate where residents were left stranded without fixed or mobile communications but the experience has sparked a warning for others buying into new developments.

The experience highlights a major flaw in telecommunications policy, as residents are not entitled to claim compensation or alternative service from NBN Co like they would be entitled to if Telstra was still responsible for laying copper wires.

The residents of Belmond Estate in Melbourne's south east are stuck in an unusual position where they have no fixed telecommunications, scant mobile coverage, and even satellite phones are unreliable.

NBN Co was supposed to install fibre optic connections - which also provides voice calls - in late 2016, but has been delayed by roadworks. The residents also discovered they live in a mobile black spot, which means reception is unreliable and intermittent.

To continue reading the article: click here. (bendigoadvertiser.com.au)

New Telstra tower to be built at Tower Hill

29 Mar 2017
TelstraNews

A NEW 55-metre telecommunications tower will be built at Tower Hill.

Telstra has been given the green light to construct the tower on land to the east of the iconic Tower Hill State Game Reserve. The new tower will join an existing tower, 190 metres to the south, which is owned by Broadcast Australia.

This tower houses radio, television, mobile phone and emergency services transmitting equipment and stands at 60-metres high.

The new tower was given the tick of approval by Moyne Shire councillors at their March meeting in Mortlake on Tuesday night.

Councillors voted 5-2 in favour of granting the planning permit. Moyne Shire planning staff had recommended councillors accept the application.

In speaking in favour of the application, Cr Colin Ryan pointed to the responsibility council had in ensuring the right infrastructure is in place.

“Moyne Shire’s planning scheme and state legislation both state requirements for the need for modern telco facilities to service the community,” Cr Ryan said.

To continue reading the article: click here. (standard.net.au)

Vodafone swipe at black spot warnings

24 Mar 2017
VodafoneNews

Vodafone Australia has pushed back against Telstra and Optus claims that domestic roaming would compromise the future of the federal government’s mobile black spots program.

With both telcos warning domestic roaming would force them to re-evaluate their continued participation, Vodafone said the program’s effectiveness had already been undermined by how hard Telstra made it for rivals to co-locate mobile equipment on their regional towers.

It’s understood that only 19 of the 429 sites Telstra picked up under the first round of the program include co-location.

“We do not believe co-location as a means to drive infrastructure competition in regional areas is working,” said Vodafone’s chief strategy officer and director of corporate affairs Dan Lloyd.

It’s a claim strenuously rejected by Telstra and Optus, with a Telstra spokeswoman telling The Australian that it has not put any obstacles in the way of any mobile network operator to co-locate on any black spot site.

“The mobile black spot program is guided by clear rules on co-location,’’ the spokeswoman said.

To continue reading the article: click here. (theaustralian.com.au)

Turnbull government spruiks 765 new mobile towers

23 Mar 2017
InTheNews

The Turnbull government has sought to remind people of its commitment to delivering better mobile phone coverage to regional areas that have been plagued with black spot problems due to lack of mobile towers.

In an announcement from Minister for Regional Communications, Fiona Nash, attended the opening of Telstra’s 100th new tower under the federal government’s Mobile Black Spot Program (MBSP) last week in Culla, Victoria, and said the Coalition was delivering for rural, regional and remote Australia.

Ms Nash said the 765 new and improved mobile phone towers will deliver new or improved coverage to 32,000 homes and businesses across 86,000 square kilometres.

It’s an important step in regional development, as communities and councils have been persistently calling for more federal funding and intervention to help alleviate the problem of mobile black spots, which have the potential to leave people stranded or unable to contact emergency services.

The program also complements a finding from Universities Australia, which recently found that start-up businesses are finding fertile soil in the regions to develop themselves, which has also come as a result of the National Broadband Network (NBN).

To continue reading the article: click here. (govnews.com.au)

City of Launceston approves Vodafone tower at Youngtown Memorial Park | Poll

23 Mar 2017
VodafoneNews

A development application for a telecommunications tower at Youngtown Memorial Park was approved by the City of Launceston at its Monday meeting.

A petition was put to the council in an effort to prevent the construction of the 25 metre high Vodaphone facility at the sports ground and community members who live in the surrounding area addressed the council with their concerns over health, amenity and consultation.

Medina Street resident Pamela Skeggs told the Aldermen the proposal was too close to existing driveways and the parking would prevent vehicle movements.

“The tower is located opposite the grandstand and highly visible from participants at any point of the stadium,” she said.

“It’s a great distress to me to find that something like this [could be built].”

Mrs Skeggs said young families lived in the vicinity and hundreds of young people and adults used the ground for sport and recreation.

To continue reading the article: click here. (examiner.com.au)

Data Drought: Call for blackspot funding to continue

23 Mar 2017
InTheNews

MOBILE blackspot funding must be continued in this year’s federal budget and priority given to areas where there’s few other services, regional communities say.

And that program’s funding should be locked in for years to come, as part of the bid to decrease the divide between the “digital haves and digital have-nots”.

A delegation of 17 farming and regional community organisations — including the National Farmers’ Federation; Better Internet for Regional, Rural and Remote Australia; Victorian Farmers Federation; Grain Growers; and the Country Women’s Association — have spent the past two days in Canberra lobbying politicians from all sides to commit to ending the data drought.

NFF president Fiona Simson said continued funding for the mobile blackspot program — which has been funded for three rounds only — must be part of next month’s budget.

To continue reading the article: click here. (weeklytimesnow.com.au)

Apocalypse now: wifi and radiation sickness sweeping the world

23 Mar 2017
InTheNews

In 2006, two researchers, Hallberg and Oberfeld, published a terrifying forecast in the journal Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine asking “Will we all become electrosensitive?”.

The researchers extrapolated figures from 17 reports published in 1985-2004 from nine countries to estimate how many people by 2017 would be sensitive to electromagnetic radiation from common household appliances, including mobile phones, and environmental exposures like power lines, and TV, phone and radio transmission masts.

According to their calculations, by now, half the world’s population would be suffering from electrosensitivity. That’s around 3.75 billion people, surely the biggest plague ever to affect the world.

And if we continue their extrapolation for a few more years, the researchers will have answered their own original question.

To continue reading the article: click here. (theconversation.com)

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